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A Simple Architecture for the City in ‘SCADpad’ Micro-Residences

In Architecture on April 12, 2014 at 11:23 PM

Earlier today in Atlanta, the Savannah College of Art & Design of Atlanta fully unveiled to the public its new “SCADpad” micro-residences project. The official program for the event defines the urban-minded project as “a community of three micro-residences on the fourth floor of SCAD Atlanta’s parking deck.” From a forward-looking, uniquely-fashioned and economic angle (the projected base cost is $40 thousand per unit) the project is certainly timely, well-planned and worth the visit. A city with an abundance of empty parking spaces and a thriving “creative class” like Atlanta should certainly be able to leverage and apply lessons learned here. According to their website, “At least half of all available [parking] spaces are vacant 40% of the time.” All events are free and open to the public through June 1 during pre-announced hours.

As the Roman architect Marcus Vitruvius Pollio wrote,

“All [buildings] should possess strength, utility, and beauty. Strength arises from carrying down the foundations to a good solid bottom, and from making a proper choice of materials without parsimony. Utility arises from a judicious distribution of the parts, so that their purposes be duly answered, and that each have its proper situation. Beauty is produced by the pleasing appearance and good taste of the whole, and by the dimensions of all the parts being duly proportioned to each other.”

The Atlanta legendary architectural likes of Abraham Bradbury and the recently passed Henri Jova are honored by the broad and bold aims of this collective project. From an anti-pollution, pro-urban renewal and broader economic perspective the project is far-sighted in additional ways, honoring the efforts of everyone from Dr. James Hansen to Jane Jacobs and Ryan Gravel to Xenophon.

While Georgia’s own Habitat for Humanity has been able to rebuild Haiti for $5 thousand per core house after the country’s major 2010 earthquake, and Ludwig Mies van der Rohe has been able to propose a simple American residential solution for a so-called “Core House” years ago, thankfully now residing in the heart of Atlanta on Peachtree Street is an energetic fruition of a simple architecture for the city of the future.

“In a city of the future it is difficult to concentrate.” Nonetheless, may Atlanta take heed of this simple project and not retreat to “the land of the blind” from Erasmus nor the land of the Cyclopes from Homer.

Included below are some pictures from the event:

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